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Canada Diagnostic Centres Privacy Statement

Canada Diagnostic Centres respects the privacy of its visitors to our website and is committed to maintaining the confidentiality and security of your personal information. As part of this commitment, we have established Privacy Principles to govern our use of patient and client information.

CDC complies with two privacy laws. One is healthcare-related and the other is business-related. In Alberta, when personal information is collected, used or disclosed in the course of providing publicly-funded healthcare services it is covered by the Health Information Act (HIA). At the same time, the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) protects personal information collected, used or disclosed by private-sector companies, including CDC. In practice, the requirements of these laws are reasonably similar and can be satisfied at the same time. Where standards differ, we meet the higher one.

We make information about our privacy policy and practices available to our patients. If you are unsure about which law applies to your information and what that means for you, or if you have any other privacy questions, requests or concerns, please refer to the Contact Us Section below.

Consent

By accessing and using our “Request an Appointment” services on this Site, you will have provided your implied consent to our collection, use, or disclosure of your personal health information in accordance with this Policy, for the purpose of scheduling diagnostic exams.

Principle 1 – Collection of Personal Information

Our website is used to inform our visitors about Canada Diagnostic Centres and our services. Should you require additional information about Canada Diagnostic Centres you may be asked to provide personal information such as your name, e-mail address, mailing address, phone number and information request. This information will be collected in a secure portion of the Web site and only used by internal personnel responsible for administering information requests.

Principle 2 – Information Disclosure

Personal information about visitors to our Web site is not disclosed to any third parties. It is also not shared with Canada Diagnostic Centres personnel who do not require such information to perform their job duties.

Principle 3 – Personal Information Collected & Used

To properly administer and understand the technology we need to support this Web site, we may collect and log the location portion of the Internet Protocol (IP) address for incoming traffic to the site (e.g. @internetserviceprovider.ca). We do not capture or link these addresses with the identity of individuals visiting our Web site.

We do not use "cookies" to track how visitors use this Web site. If we change the services provided through the Web site to require the use of "cookies", we will inform you by updating this privacy statement.

Accessing Your Personal Information

Any requests for access to personal information held by Canada Diagnostic Centres must be received in writing and specify the information you are requesting access to. All written requests must be directed to:

Privacy Officer, Canada Diagnostic Centres

#1, 6020- 1A St. SW
Calgary, Alberta
T2H 0G3

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calgary pain management therapy pmt
Home  / General Services  / Pain Management

Pain Management

Pain management is an interdisciplinary medical approach to relieving pain and improving quality of life. CDC offers pain management through fluoroscopy or ultrasound guided injections and post-injection physiotherapy in order to provide a full-range pain treatment program.

Description

Pain management is an interdisciplinary medical approach to relieving pain and improving quality of life. CDC offers pain management through fluoroscopy or ultrasound guided injections and post-injection physiotherapy in order to provide a full-range pain treatment program.

Pain management therapies are useful in treating various conditions that cause pain and discomfort including (but not limited to): chronic tendonitis, osteoarthritis and any post traumatic injuries. It can also be useful for patients undergoing joint replacement surgery, as it allows patients to maintain daily activities until their surgery date.

Fluoroscopy Guided Injections

Fluoroscopy is a medical imaging technique that uses x-ray technology to produce real time images of an internal body structure. Injected medication (usually cortisone) is guided to the area of pain (usually a joint) by fluoroscopy. This allows for a visual on the placement and position of the needle and effective delivery of the medication to the area causing pain.

The most common areas injected include (but are not limited to):

  • Shoulders
  • Knee
  • Elbow
  • Hip & Pelvis
  • Wrist & Hand
  • Ankle & Foot
  • Joints & Tendons
  • Bursa
  • Lumbar Spine
  • Nerve Root
  • Facet & Sacroiliac Joints

Ultrasound Guided Injections

Certain areas affected by pain require ultrasound guidance to aid in the accurate placement of the needle.

These areas include (but are not limited to):

  • Baker’s Cyst
  • Ganglion Cyst
  • Carpal Tunnel
  • Carpal Tunnel
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Piriformis Syndrome

What areas can be treated?

Peripheral

  • Knees
  • Shoulders
  • Hips and Pelvis
  • Ankles and Feet
  • Elbows and Wrists
  • Hands

Spinal

Areas located along the spinal column including the low back (lumbar spine), midback (thoracic spine), neck (cervical spine), and head can be treated:

  • Facet and sacroiliac SI joint arthritis
  • Spinal nerve roots (sciatica)
  • Degenerative disc disease
  • Headache

Spinal Procedures

Radiofrequency Neurotomy (RFN)

A procedure that involves applying heat to a specific nerve path in order to disrupt pain signals to the brain and therefore eliminate pain. This procedure is often used to treat facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain. Patients should take 600-800 mg of Ibuprofen every 8 hours for 3 days following the procedure.

Medial Branch blocks (MBB)

A procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into small medial nerves connected to a certain facet joint. If you feel pain relief, this facet can be determined as the source of pain. MBB can also be used prior to an ablation to determine proper nerve selection.

Nerve Root Block (NRB)

A procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into a nerve root (where the nerve exits the spinal column). If you feel pain relief, this nerve can be determined as the source of pain. An NRB is commonly used to treat arm or leg pain.

There is a possibility that the freezing used will cause the leg (in a lumbar injection) or arm (in a cervical injection) of affected side to go numb. This can leave you unable to walk or weight bare until the freezing wears off, usually within a couple hours.

There are the added risks of epidural hematoma and epidural abscess, although rare.

Epidural Steroid Injections (ESI)

A procedure that involves injection a steroid directly into the dura, the sac around the nerve root, which reduces inflammation and minimizes pain.

There is a possibility that the freezing used will cause the leg (in a lumbar injection) or arm (in a cervical injection) of affected side to go numb. This can leave you unable to walk or weight bare until the freezing wears off, usually within a couple hours.

There are the added risks of epidural hematoma and epidural abscess, although rare.

Therapy Choices

Please note: Starred (*) procedures come at an additional cost to patients.

Cortisone

A steroid that is injected into joints/bursas, tendon sheeths (shoulder, wrist, ankle), nerve roots (C-spine and L-spine), which reduces inflammation and minimizes pain.
Please note, a cortisone injection will not be injected into the same area of pain sooner than 3 months apart.

Monovisc ®*

A synthetic synovial fluid that is a gel-like substance that is injected into an affected joint (usually a large joint such as the hip or knee) in order to lubricate the joint and improve function. This is injection is commonly used to treat mild to moderate arthritis.

Orthovisc ®*

A gel-like substance, like monovisc but in a smaller dose, that is injected into an affected joint (usually a small joint such as the wrist, elbow or toe) in order to lubricate the joint and improve function. Orthovisc is administered as three injections over the course of three visits.

Cingal™ NEW

A viscous (thick), sterile mixture of hyaluronan(Monovisc) and a steroid, that is injected into the knee. It offers fast pain relief for Osteoarthritis in the knee generally beginning 24 hours after administration and lasting for up to 6 month. Cingal is administered as a single injection.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)*

A Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection is a procedure in which your own blood is drawn and centrifuged to extract platelet rich plasma (a concentrated source of healing factors). This substance is then injected back into the affected area to enhance the natural healing process and reduce pain.
Learn more

Percutaneous Needle Tenotomy (PNT)

A procedure in which an affected area is repetitively needled, which induces bleeding and triggers a natural healing response in order to reduce pain.

Botox ®*

A purified neurotoxin complex protein produced from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that is injected into various sites on the head and back in order to reduce headache frequency and treat chronic migraines. You may be a candidate for Botox injections if you meet the following criteria:

  • Secondary causes have been ruled out
  • Headaches typically last 4 hours or longer
  • Diagnosed with Chronic Migraine (>15 headache days/month with >8 being migrainous)
  • Wishes an interventional alternative therapy to headache treatment

Under most circumstances, these injections are covered by Alberta Health Services and Botox is covered by most insurance plans. In addition, BOTOX Therapeutic is also covered by Alberta BLUE CROSS® “Non-Group Coverage”, AISH, the Alberta Adult Health Benefit (AAHB)/Alberta Works and the Alberta Income Support Program.


CDC Physiotherapy Program

In collaboration with Calgary’s leading physiotherapists, Canada Diagnostic Centres would like to assist you further with your pain reduction and recovery. We firmly believe that a proper physiotherapy program will prolong the benefits of the procedure and how well you function afterwards.

Post-Procedure Physiotherapy

Post-procedure physiotherapy is essential for most patients to maximize their functional recovery and is highly recommended. CDC has partnered with some of the best physiotherapy providers in Calgary to facilitate this crucial part of your recovery.

Where do I get post-procedure physiotherapy?

Any qualified physiotherapist can assist you after a pain management injection. Should you require information on some qualified physiotherapist options, our clinics have information cards on our preferred providers.

Is there funding available?
  • You may have coverage through your employee benefits or insurance plans.
  • Some with low income, or who have coverage under AISH may be eligible for free treatments.
  • If you were hurt at work, your treatments may be covered by WCB.
  • Physiotherapy treatment may be covered by your MVA insurance company in the event you were involved in a motor vehicle accident.
  • If you are covered under RCMP, DVA or Alberta school employee benefit plans, physiotherapy treatments may be covered.

What To Expect

We make it a priority to ensure you are at ease during your pain management injection.

  • Complete the necessary medical forms obtained from front desk staff.
  • Canada Diagnostic Centres provides private and secure change rooms (at most locations). Comfortable two piece scrubs will be provided for you to change into (at most locations). You may be asked to remove your jewelry.
  • One of our friendly technologists will take you to the exam room and position you on a cushioned table. Before your exam begins the technologist will record your current pain level on a chart.
  • The radiologist will clean the site to be injected and will administer a local anesthetic into that area.
  • Once the anesthetic has numbed the area, the radiologist will use fluoroscopy (or ultrasound) to guide the needle into the joint/tendon. Once the needle tip reaches the site, x-ray dye will be injected in order to confirm the needle is positioned in the correct spot.
  • The radiologist will then inject the pain medication (usually a steroid) into the area.
  • Once the treatment is complete, a technologist will ask that you remain in the waiting room for 10 minutes and at that time will re-evaluate your pain level on the chart.
  • Once the procedure is complete, you are free to leave and resume normal activity. However, please refrain from any heavy lifting or other strenuous activities in the 24 hours following your treatment.
  • Results vary by individual: it can take anywhere from two days to two weeks before your condition improves and pain relief, on average, can last as long as six months.
  • CDC recommends that you follow-up with your referring doctor within two weeks of your treatment to evaluate its success, or sooner if you feel no improvements in your symptoms.

Medical Fact

Fact: The benefits of a single treatment can last for months; however, this varies by individual. In some cases, the medication will last only a few weeks and in other cases the medication will last for a year or more.